Bro. Larry & Sheila visit Albuquerque

Brother Denis Murphy has spent time at several Catholic Worker houses, but Trinity House looks like it might be the place where he’ll settle in for a while!

Trinity House Catholic Worker

Trinity House Catholic Worker

Located in southwest Albuquerque on Five Points Road, it is a sort of a “Catholic strip”. A couple blocks one way is the Franciscan parish of Holy Family , and a couple blocks the other way is Fr. Richard Rohr’s Center for Action and Contemplation. Richard joined us one evening for dinner, and the following day we stopped by the Center for a visit. He kindly took the time to give us a tour.

Denis and I with Richard Rohr

Denis and I with Richard Rohr

Denis is a student in the two-year program at the CAC, which was his original motivation for relocating to Albuquerque in the first place. A combination of mild weather, a good location, plus the very positive difference Denis has made in his two years there seems to point to Trinity House being a vey good fit in so many ways.

An outdoor dinner with community members, guests, and neighbor Richard Rohr in the front yard of Trinity House.

An outdoor dinner with community members, guests, and neighbor Richard Rohr in the front yard of Trinity House.

The three of us also had the opportunity to visit the Albuquerque campus of Lewis University. Executive Director Jim Saya gave us a tour of this impressive and growing campus in Albuquerque, and we met several staff  members.

The three of us with Jim Saya, Exec Dtr.

The three of us with Jim Saya, Exec Dtr.

Bro. Denis and Sheila in the Lewis parking lot.

Bro. Denis and Sheila in the Lewis parking lot.

Currently, Lewis occupies the first floor of the building, which is conveniently located near an expressway and a nearby shopping center. As a Lewis trustee, I was very happy to make a visit and get a better idea of all that is happening at “Lewis Southwest”!

We also explored Santa Fe and took a trip out to see the Sangre de Cristo property, where so many Brothers and others have spent time. The caretaker and his little son gave us a tour. In Santa Fe, our first stop was the Georgia O’Keefe museum downtown. As many of you know, this part of New Mexico is where Georgia O’Keefe settled and did some of her most famous work.

The Cathedral of Saint Francis of Assisi in Santa Fe.

The Cathedral of Saint Francis of Assisi in Santa Fe.

The original icon of San Miguel  on the reredos of the Cathedral.

The original icon of San Miguel on the reredos of the Cathedral.

Santa Fe is lovely, filled with wonderful art, and also just a tad “pricey”. We very much enjoyed strolling around the historic downtown and we had a very pleasant lunch there.

Lunch in Santa Fe

Lunch in Santa Fe

Right outside Albuquerque is the Petroglyph National Monument, and we spent a sunny late afternoon visiting the site. It is estimated that these were done around 1300AD, but no one is certain what each image depicts.

A "typical" petroglyph

A “typical” petroglyph

We also strolled around Old Town, which is the site of the original setting of the city. It’s a delightful area to spend time in, with lots of local folk art represented.

The Church of St. Philip Neri in the heart of Old Town.

The Church of St. Philip Neri in the heart of Old Town.

Sheila and I were both very impressed with the hospitality and welcome we received everywhere, especially on Five Points Road. We strongly encourage you to plan a trip to northern New Mexico. It really did live up to its name. “The Land of Enchantment.”

A few parting shots:

Buster and Paws, the Trinity House "watchdogs"

Buster and Paws, the Trinity House “watchdogs”

"Tres Amigas": Mary Ann, Sheila, and Mary in  their usual mode!

“Tres Amigas”: Mary Ann, Sheila, and Mary in their usual mode!

MUCHAS GRACIAS to Denis and everyone who made our stay so memorable!

-BL

 

 

 

 

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Brothers Gather for Triduum Retreat

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The Midwest District Triduum Retreat was held at Saint Mary of the Lake University April 2-5. The presenter and presider was Fr. Ivan Cormac Marsh, O. Carm.  There were about 80 participants, including four postulants and two contacts.

Bro. Larry, Visitor, with Contacts and Postulants after the Easter Vigil Service.

Bro. Larry, Visitor, with Contacts and Postulants after the Easter Vigil Service.

Comments from two retreatants: “This is my first retreat in 10 years. It’s great to be back! The opportunity to be together for prayer, reflection, and socials is wonderful.” “Thanks for a wonderful Holy Triduum Retreat! It was just what I needed to recharge my batteries!”

A special thanks to  Brother Mark Snodgrass, who coordinated the retreat.

 

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April 4-5 – Holy Saturday / Easter Sunday

Mark 16:1-7 ● John 20:1-9

He's been raised up

Mary Magdalene, Mary the mother of James, and Salome saw a young man sitting on the right side, dressed all in white. They were completely taken aback, astonished.
He said, “Don’t be afraid. I know you’re looking for Jesus the Nazarene, the One they nailed on the cross. He’s been raised up; he’s here no longer. You can see for yourselves that the place is empty. Now—on your way. Tell his disciples and Peter that he is going on ahead of you to Galilee. You’ll see him there, exactly as he said.”

Mark 16:5-7

REFLECTION


The resurrection stories can be boiled down to three mandates. First: “Do not be afraid.” Second: “Peace be with you.” Third: “Go and tell someone the good news.” Here we read of two of these injunctions: the encouragement to let go of fear and to start spreading the good news. In fact, even before the resurrection stories, the Bible is full of injunctions from angels and from Jesus to “be not afraid.” So let’s let go of our fear and go out with boldness to spread the joy of the resurrection—in our workplaces, in our families, and in our neighborhoods, remembering the saying, “Preach the gospel at all times. When necessary, use words.”

ACTION


What keeps you from sharing the good news of the gospel more often? Is it fear of ridicule? Fear of being cast as a religious weirdo? Fear that others think that God is irrelevant? Ask for the grace to let go of your fear and to have the courage to more boldly proclaim, with your life and/or with your words, the good news that Jesus is for you.

Reprinted with permission. For more information about this booklet and Bible translation, please see TheMessageCatholic.com.

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April 3 – Good Friday of the Lord’s Passion

Isaiah 52:13-53:12 ● Hebrews 4:14-16; 5:7-9 ● John 18:1-19:42

Take the mercy, accept the help

Now that we know what we have—Jesus, this great High Priest with ready access to God—let’s not let it slip through our fingers. We don’t have a priest who is out of touch with our reality. He’s been through weakness and testing, experienced it all—all but the sin. So let’s walk right up to him and get what he is so ready to give. Take the mercy, accept the help.
While he lived on earth, anticipating death, Jesus cried out in pain and wept in sorrow as he offered up priestly prayers to God. Because he honored God, God answered him. Though he was God’s Son, he learned trusting-obedience by what he suffered, just as we do.

Hebrews 4:14-16; 5:7-9

REFLECTION


What separates Christianity from all of the other great world religions is Jesus: God who became human, a human who “experienced it all” except for sin. How fortunate we are to have a God we can pray to who has been through weakness and testing, who knows what it is like to cry out in pain and weep in sorrow. This Jesus is our greatest advocate, and we can go directly to him to ask for help. We don’t need to be ashamed to ask, because Jesus knows what it is like to try to trust in God even while suffering.

ACTION


The scriptures often urge us to ask God boldly and directly for what we need. Bring your requests to Jesus now, without shame.

Reprinted with permission. For more information about this booklet and Bible translation, please see TheMessageCatholic.com.

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April 2 – Holy Thursday

Exodus 12:1-8,11-14 ●  1 Corinthians 11:23-26 ●  John 13:1-15

Wash each others' feet

Jesus knew that the Father had put him in complete charge of everything, that he came from God and was on his way back to God. So he got up from the supper table, set aside his robe, and put on an apron. Then he poured water into a basin and began to wash the feet of the disciples, drying them with his apron.
Then he said, “Do you understand what I have done to you? You address me as ‘Teacher’ and ‘Master,’ and rightly so. That is what I am. So if I, the Master and Teacher, washed your feet, you must now wash each other’s feet. I’ve laid down a pattern for you. What I’ve done, you do. I’m only pointing out the obvious. A servant is not ranked above his master; an employee doesn’t give orders to the employer. If you understand what I’m telling you, act like it—and live a blessed life.

John 13:3-5,12-17

REFLECTION


With this foot washing, Jesus isn’t simply reversing the hierarchy of his hierarchical culture. With his example, he is showing his disciples a different way—one in which no one is a master and no one has to be a slave. In Jesus’ community of friends, all are asked to serve one another and be served.

ACTION


Think of a relationship you are in now in which you experience a power imbalance. Prayerfully consider if you are called to take some action to equalize the relationship. Are you being asked to wash someone else’s feet? Are you being invited to have your feet washed by another?

Reprinted with permission. For more information about this booklet and Bible translation, please see TheMessageCatholic.com.

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April 1 – Wednesday of Holy Week

Isaiah 50:4-9a ●  Matthew 26:14-25

My champion is right here

The Master, GOD , opened my ears,
and I didn’t go back to sleep,
didn’t pull the covers back over my head.
I followed orders,
stood there and took it while they beat me,
held steady while they pulled out my beard,
Didn’t dodge their insults, faced them as they spit in my face.
And the Master, GOD , stays right there and helps me,
so I’m not disgraced.
Therefore I set my face like flint,
confident that I’ll never regret this.
My champion is right here. Let’s take our stand together!
Who dares bring suit against me? Let him try!
Look! the Master, GOD , is right here.
Who would dare call me guilty?

Isaiah 50:5-9a

REFLECTION


To be God’s servant, we are called to listen attentively, to stay awake, and to “take orders” faithfully, trusting that God has a greater plan than what we can see. As Christians, we know that suffering is inevitable, but that God stands right there with us in the midst of it.

ACTION


Listen closely today for how you are called to take a stand against evil even though it might entail suffering. Ask for the courage to “follow God’s orders.”

Reprinted with permission. For more information about this booklet and Bible translation, please see TheMessageCatholic.com.

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March 30 – Monday of Holy Week

Isaiah 42:1-7 ●  John 12:1-11

The Fragance of the oils

Mary came in with a jar of very expensive aromatic oils, anointed and massaged Jesus’ feet, and then wiped them with her hair. The fragrance of the oils filled the house.
Judas Iscariot, one of his disciples, even then getting ready to betray him, said, “Why wasn’t this oil sold and the money given to the poor? It would have easily brought three hundred silver pieces.” He said this not because he cared two cents about the poor but because he was a thief. He was in charge of their common funds, but also embezzled them.
Jesus said, “Let her alone. She’s anticipating and honoring the day of my burial. You always have the poor with you. You don’t always have me.”

John 12:3-8

REFLECTION


We can read this story is a microcosm of the Gospel message. A luxurious gift is offered with deep love, and Jesus shows us how to receive it with gratitude. But a dark spirit of jealousy, miserliness, judgment, and self-interest opposes the gift and finds fault with it. Yet Jesus refuses to give into this spirit and upholds the beauty and love offered.

ACTION


When have you opposed or protested giving gifts of love (in the form of money, acts of service, forgiveness, etc.) to others for any reason? Pray for the ability to be gracious and generous in your own giving, as well as celebratory of others’ generosity.

Reprinted with permission. For more information about this booklet and Bible translation, please see TheMessageCatholic.com.

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March 29 – Palm Sunday of the Lord’s Passion

Mark 11:1-10 ●  Is. 50:4-7 ●  Phil. 2:6-11 ●  Mark 14:1-15:47

Blessed is He

When they were nearing Jerusalem, at Bethphage and Bethany on Mount Olives, he sent off two of the disciples with instructions: “Go to the village across from you. As soon as you enter, you’ll find a colt tethered, one that has never yet been ridden. Untie it and bring it.”
The people gave him a wonderful welcome, some throwing their coats on the street, others spreading out rushes they had cut in the fields. Running ahead and following after, they were calling out,

Hosanna! Blessed is he who comes in God’s name! Blessed the coming kingdom of our father David! Hosanna in highest heaven!

Mark 11:1-2,8-10

REFLECTION


Jesus didn’t show up in Jerusalem like a mighty warrior riding a war-tested military horse. He entered on an inexperienced young colt, without an army or accompanying bodyguards. The common people gave him the only welcome poor people could give, spreading out their own coats and cut foliage for their version of a royal carpet. Yet it was a spontaneous, wonderful, joyous welcome as they recognized his true authority—not as the military king of their country, but the one who comes in God’s name.

ACTION


Do you ever miss the coming of God into your life because He shows up without fanfare and perhaps in a much lowlier state than you were expecting? Pray to have your eyes opened to the unexpected ways Jesus will come to you today.

Reprinted with permission. For more information about this booklet and Bible translation, please see TheMessageCatholic.com.

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March 28 – Saturday of the 5th Week in Lent

Ezekiel 37:21-28 ●  John 11:45-56

He Keeps on Doing Thinkgs

The high priests and Pharisees called a meeting of the Jewish ruling body. “What do we do now?” they asked. “This man keeps on doing things, creating God-signs. If we let him go on, pretty soon everyone will be believing in him and the Romans will come and remove what little power and privilege we still have.”
From that day on, they plotted to kill him. So Jesus no longer went out in public among the Jews. He withdrew into the country bordering the desert to a town called Ephraim and secluded himself there with his disciples.
The Jewish Passover was coming up. Crowds of people were making their way from the country up to Jerusalem to get themselves ready for the Feast. They were curious about Jesus. There was a lot of talk of him among those standing around in the Temple: “What do you think? Do you think he’ll show up at the Feast or not?”

John 11:47-48,53-56

REFLECTION


Do you ever get the impression that the religious leaders in the gospels sound like little kids incessantly arguing and complaining? Jesus isn’t following their rules, and he definitely isn’t conforming to their assumptions of how God acts. They can’t abide by his non-conformity, so they have to eliminate him.
Jesus understands the danger so he withdraws to prepare himself for the confrontation that inevitably is to come.

ACTION


Where can you withdraw to prepare yourself for a trial that is coming your way? With whom can you safely surround yourself?

Reprinted with permission. For more information about this booklet and Bible translation, please see TheMessageCatholic.com.

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